Vaccinations

Reduce Risks of Cancer

Posted by on Oct 18, 2014 in Healthy Habits, Nutrition, Vaccinations | 0 comments

We all know that smoking is the number one cause of cancer. However, there are other ways studies have shown that can reduce the risk of cancer. 1. Check for radon levels before buying your new home 2. Avoid tanning beds 3. Breastfeeding 4. HPV vaccination 5. Maintain a healthy body weight To read more about reducing risks of cancer, click here.

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Seaonal Flu Shot

Posted by on Oct 4, 2014 in Flu, flu shot, Vaccinations | 0 comments

Seaonal Flu Shot

Get your flu shot today at ASAP Wellness Center!   What is the flu shot? The flu shot is a vaccine given with a needle, usually in the arm. The seasonal flu shot protects against the three or four influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season Who should get vaccinated this season? Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season. This recommendation has been in place since February 24, 2010 when CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted for “universal” flu vaccination in the United States to expand protection against the flu to more people. Vaccination to prevent influenza is particularly important for people who are at high risk of serious complications from influenza. Who should not get a flu shot? Different flu vaccines are approved for use in different groups of people. Factors that can determine a person’s suitability for vaccination, or vaccination with a particular vaccine, include a person’s age, health (current and past) and any relevant allergies, including an egg allergy. Flu Shot: People who cannot get a flu shot People who should talk to their doctor before getting the flu shot Nasal Spray Vaccine: People who cannot get a nasal spray vaccine People who should talk to their doctor before getting the nasal spray vaccine   How effective is the flu shot? The ability of a flu vaccine to protect a person depends on the age and health status of the person getting the vaccine, and the similarity or “match” between the viruses or virus in the vaccine and those in circulation. For more information, see Vaccine Effectiveness – How well does the Flu Vaccine Work. What are the risks from getting a flu shot? You cannot get the flu from a flu shot. The risk of a flu shot causing serious harm or death is extremely small. However, a vaccine, like any medicine, may rarely cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. Almost all people who get influenza vaccine have no serious problems from it. What are the side effects that could occur? Soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given Fever (low grade) Aches The intradermal flu shot may cause other additional mild side effects including: Toughness and itching where the shot was given If these problems occur, they begin soon after the shot and usually last one to two days. Can severe problems occur? Life-threatening allergic reactions are very rare. Signs of serious allergic reaction can include breathing problems, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heartbeat, or dizziness. If they do occur, it is within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot. These reactions are more likely to occur among persons with a severe allergy to eggs, because the viruses used in most influenza vaccines are grown in hens’ eggs. While severe reactions are uncommon, you should let your doctor, nurse, clinic, or pharmacist know if you have a history of allergy or severe reaction to flu vaccine or any part of flu vaccine, including eggs. There is a small possibility that influenza vaccine could be associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome, no more than 1 or 2 cases per million people vaccinated. This is much lower than the risk of severe complications from flu, which can be prevented by flu vaccine. What should I do if I have had a serious reaction to seasonal influenza vaccine? Call a doctor, or get to a doctor right away. Tell your doctor what happened, the date and time it happened, and when you got the flu shot. Ask your doctor, nurse,...

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How to Fight the Flu

Posted by on Mar 3, 2014 in Flu, flu shot, Vaccinations | 0 comments

Take 3 Actions To Fight The Flu The CDC Says:   1. Take time to get a flu vaccine. CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses. While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the three viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See upcoming season’s Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.) Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine as soon as the current season’s vaccines are available. Vaccination of high risk persons is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness. People at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older. Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to high risk people. Children younger than 6 months are at high risk of serious flu illness, but are too young to be vaccinated. People who care for them should be vaccinated instead. 2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way. Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu. See Everyday Preventive Actions  [257 KB, 2 pages] and Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) for more information about actions – apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine – that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of illnesses like influenza (flu). 3. Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them. If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness. Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter. Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high risk factors  [702 KB, 2 pages], treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay. Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health or is very sick from the flu. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug. Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a...

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Essential Vaccination Information for Most Older Adults

Posted by on Feb 12, 2014 in Flu, pneumonia, Shingles, Tetanus/Diphtheria, Vaccinations | 0 comments

Some factors that affect your health are outside of your control. However, many important risk factors are within your power to change. This includes getting shots, called vaccinations, that help protect you from certain illnesses. Vaccines are some of the safest medicines around. Although all medicines, including vaccines, pose the rare chance of serious side effects, for most people, the risks from the diseases are far greater than the risks from the vaccines. Contact Us to learn for more information and if your vaccinations are up-to-date! The American Geriatrics Society Foundation for Health in Aging recommends the following Vaccination Information for Most Older Adults.   Flu Shot WHAT IT DOES Protects against annual influenza viruses.   WHO NEEDS IT The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend the flu shot for everyone six months of age and older. While everyone should get a flu vaccine, the CDC notes that it is especially important for the following people to get flu shots because they are at high risk for having serious flu-related complications: anyone who is 65 years of age or older; nursing home residents; and people with serious health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma, lung disease or HIV. Caregivers for older adults should also get vaccinated to avoid spreading the flu. WHO SHOULD NOT GET IT People who are allergic to eggs, have had allergic reactions to flu shots in the past, or have been diagnosed with Guillian-Barre Syndrome.   WHEN TO GET IT Because new strains of the flu develop constantly, the flu vaccine must be given yearly. You should get your flu shot as soon as it becomes available in community, usually in the late summer or early fall.   Pneumococcal Shot WHAT IT DOES Protects against pneumococcal bacteria, which can cause pneumonia and blood and brain infections. WHO NEEDS IT Anyone 65 years or older who has not previously received the vaccine. WHEN TO GET IT Only once, unless you had the shot before turning 65 (in that case you’ll need a “booster” shot after 5 years).   Tetanus/Diphtheria Shot WHAT IT DOES Protects against two potentially deadly bacterial infections. A second, and different, form of the vaccine (Tdap) protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (the adult whooping cough). WHO NEEDS IT Everyone. It is now recommended to get a one-time dose of the “Tdap” version (the adult whooping cough vaccine) if you are 65 or older and have contact with an infant, or simply want to be protected from whooping cough. WHEN TO GET IT Once every 10 years.   Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Shot WHAT IT DOES Protects against the development of shingles—outbreaks of sometimes intensely painful rashes or blisters on the skin—reducing the risk by 51%. Protects against the development of chronic pain from shingles (also called postherpetic neuralgia), reducing the risk by 66%. WHO NEEDS IT The CDC recommends this vaccine for adults 60 years of age and older. WHO SHOULD NOT GET IT People who have active tuberculosis or problems with their immune system, such as leukemia, lymphoma, other malignant diseases involving the bone marrow or lymph system, or HIV infection, as well as those taking drugs that suppress the immune system. WHEN TO GET IT One time after the age of 60 years...

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